‘No way’ that marine mammal populations will rebound after extinction

The numbers are staggering.

Over the past 10 years, more than 3,000 marine mammals have been wiped out by pollution and habitat loss, according to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.

But there is no sign the tide is turning.

Scientists say the numbers are still staggering, and that the impacts of the pollution crisis are already being felt.

“There is no way that we will be able to recover,” said David Kavanagh, a professor of marine biology at the University of Toronto.

The scientists say that, despite decades of intensive conservation work, the marine mammal population is on the verge of extinction. “

They are going to be extinct, in some cases within a few decades.”

The scientists say that, despite decades of intensive conservation work, the marine mammal population is on the verge of extinction.

The scientific community has been working hard to understand why.

What they know is that the marine mammals are losing ground to the pressures of climate change, pollution, pollution-related diseases, habitat loss and habitat fragmentation.

And, according with some of the findings of recent studies, the pressures are coming at the expense of the species’ genetic diversity.

“We know that the loss of biodiversity is occurring over the course of the oceans,” said Kavanah.

“What we know is there is a very high degree of biodiversity loss in the marine world, and it is not going away.” “

While scientists are focused on the threats posed by climate change and pollution, there is another, much bigger problem, the experts say. “

What we know is there is a very high degree of biodiversity loss in the marine world, and it is not going away.”

While scientists are focused on the threats posed by climate change and pollution, there is another, much bigger problem, the experts say.

They say it is happening at the same time as they are dealing with an existential threat posed by global warming.

As temperatures rise, the oceans absorb more CO2 and the sea levels rise.

That will lead to more frequent and more severe bleaching events, which will lead the marine animals to migrate, or die.

That is because the ocean absorbs more CO 2 over time, the scientists say, and if the oceans continue to warm it will make it harder for the organisms to survive.

In fact, scientists say if CO2 levels continue to rise at their current pace, sea levels will rise by as much as 20 metres within the next 10 years.

That would mean the oceans could lose as much coral as they did in the 1960s.

“In order to respond to these impacts, we need to understand more about how our marine ecosystems are responding to the changes that are occurring,” said Michael Mann, a climate scientist at Penn State University.

“It’s really important to understand what we’re doing to these ecosystems, and how that’s changing the ocean’s ability to recover from a lot of the changes in CO2.”

Kavanag is among those scientists who believe there is an urgent need to act on climate change.

He says it is important to do what is necessary to address climate change before it’s too late.

“If we’re going to have the most robust and effective response to these threats, we really have to have an early-warning system for these kinds of impacts, so we can have a more accurate picture of how they are occurring.”

Scientists say that the scientific community is starting to catch on to the threat of climate warming.

They are starting to look at marine organisms as part of the global carbon cycle, and have begun to study their responses to CO2 changes.

In addition, scientists are looking at how climate change impacts the animals in the oceans and how to deal with it.

“A lot of research is happening in marine biology to understand how to manage the impacts, and to do things like protect populations of marine mammals and marine fish,” said Mann.

“And I think that is really starting to pay off in terms of the fact that the scientists are beginning to understand the consequences of the warming of the ocean.”

What is happening to the sea around us?

While the impacts from climate change are being felt on the ocean today, it’s happening at a much deeper level than that.

There is a global threat to the marine life on the planet that scientists say is unfolding right now.

In an effort to understand this threat, a group of scientists are collaborating to create a database of the marine animal populations on the Earth.

The Global Biodiversity Information System (GBIS), an open source online database that will help researchers understand and understand the threats that are impacting marine life, will be released next year.

The database will provide a wealth of information about marine mammals, including information on their health, diet, habitats and their migrations.

It will also help scientists to better understand how climate and pollution are affecting the global marine ecosystem and how the marine species are responding.

This information will also